Track of the week

Hunned Bandz

Tanukichan

Napalm Records / 2018
9.2


Alien Weaponry

By: Alex Horner

Alien Weaponry fuses old and new heavy metal styles to forge an impeccable album. AW pushes the envelope in an utterly new way, something not seen since the dawn of djent. Tū is AW’s first full-length and damn does this sucker rip. I found myself involuntarily head banging to almost every track, goose bumps on my arms. These kids are going to be big, as big as a self-proclaimed thrash metal band can be, if they keep this up. This album is heavy, really heavy, like breakdowns-heavy but somehow still accessible. The mix is rich and enormous. The bass tone cuts through the mix beautifully and is married to organic drum sounds to create a sonic onslaught of emotional discharge. AW expertly walks the thin line between clean vocals and satisfying hardcore vocals allowing both to shine in the appropriate spots. The choruses do come dangerously close to the worst parts of nu-metal.

Frontman Lewis de Jong (who is only 15) commands the Māori language with such emotion and power that the gravity of the meaning behind the lyrics transcends the language barrier. The lyrical themes provoke an interest in the indigenous culture of New Zealand, something that simply can’t be said for any other band. The aggressive mix of English and Māori lines weave together to present a front that is unabashedly critical of the world past and present. Lewis’s 7-string is backed by his brother Henry on drums and flanked by Ethan Trembath on a 5-string bass, the talent of this power trio is mind blowing.


Check out the music video for “Whispers” that dropped yesterday!


Alien Weaponry

By: Alex Horner

Napalm Records / 2018
9.2

Alien Weaponry fuses old and new heavy metal styles to forge an impeccable album. AW pushes the envelope in an utterly new way, something not seen since the dawn of djent. Tū is AW’s first full-length and damn does this sucker rip. I found myself involuntarily head banging to almost every track, goose bumps on my arms. These kids are going to be big, as big as a self-proclaimed thrash metal band can be, if they keep this up. This album is heavy, really heavy, like breakdowns-heavy but somehow still accessible. The mix is rich and enormous. The bass tone cuts through the mix beautifully and is married to organic drum sounds to create a sonic onslaught of emotional discharge. AW expertly walks the thin line between clean vocals and satisfying hardcore vocals allowing both to shine in the appropriate spots. The choruses do come dangerously close to the worst parts of nu-metal.

Frontman Lewis de Jong (who is only 15) commands the Māori language with such emotion and power that the gravity of the meaning behind the lyrics transcends the language barrier. The lyrical themes provoke an interest in the indigenous culture of New Zealand, something that simply can’t be said for any other band. The aggressive mix of English and Māori lines weave together to present a front that is unabashedly critical of the world past and present. Lewis’s 7-string is backed by his brother Henry on drums and flanked by Ethan Trembath on a 5-string bass, the talent of this power trio is mind blowing.


Check out the music video for “Whispers” that dropped yesterday!